Buyology: Truth and Lies About Why We Buy () is a bestselling book by Martin Lindstrom, in which he analyzes what makes people buy. The author. In BUYOLOGY, Lindstrom presents the astonishing findings from his groundbreaking, three-year, seven-million-dollar neuromarketing study. now. With the support of 20 leading scientists, Martin. Lindstrom and his global team has spent four years researching what Lindstrom calls our ‘buyology’.

Author: Dikree Zuk
Country: Bolivia
Language: English (Spanish)
Genre: Automotive
Published (Last): 24 October 2014
Pages: 478
PDF File Size: 1.81 Mb
ePub File Size: 14.23 Mb
ISBN: 443-6-68378-832-5
Downloads: 97209
Price: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader: Mikree

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Buyology by Martin Lindstrom. How much do we know about lindstfom we buy?

An eye-grabbing advertisement, a catchy slogan, an infectious jingle? In BUYOLOGY, Lindstrom presents the astonishing findings from his groundbreaking, three-year, seven-million-dollar neuromarketing study, a cutting-edge experiment that peered inside the brains of 2, volunteers from all around the world as they encountered various ads, logos, commercials, brands, and products.

His startling results shatter much of what we have long believed about what seduces our interest and drives us to buy. Gruesome health warnings on cigarette packages not only fail to discourage smoking, they actually make smokers want to light up.

Despite government bans, subliminal advertising still surrounds us — from bars to highway billboards to supermarket shelves. Other senses — smell, touch, and sound – are so powerful, they physically arouse us when we see a product. In many cases, people in skimpy clothing and suggestive poses not only fail to persuade us to buy products – they often turn us away.

Companies routinetly copy from the world of religion and create rituals — like drinking a Corona with a lime — to capture our hard-earned dollars. Includes a foreword by Paco Underhill. Marginpages. Published October 21st by Currency first published January 1st To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Buyologyplease sign up. See 1 question about Buyology….

Lists with This Book. Nov 06, Mark rated it it was ok Shelves: Lindstrom gets all excited about doing brain scans on consumers as they view advertisements and products.

Lindstrom seems to think that technology — all technology — is neutral. His example is that hammers can do nasty things but there is no need to outlaw, restrict or ban hammers. As long as we are talking about hammers, that is.

But when discussing companies doing fMRI scans on potential consumers to get at their instinctual, pre-rational impressions of adve Summation: But when discussing companies doing fMRI scans on potential consumers to get at their instinctual, pre-rational impressions of advertisements and products, the BS meter goes off: Who has access to this technology? Who will be able to control the use of this technology? Will the control be primarily democratic or will it require bureaucratic, centralized organizations to manage it?

Who will primarily benefit from the use of this technology? And mainly, who can afford it? The answers to such questions should show pretty readily if a technology can honestly be considered neutral or not. Lindstrom, when writing about your groundbreaking new experiments that delve into the inner workings of consumer behavior, please refrain from starting each chapter with the equivalent of the following: I am now going to blow your mind with the most brilliant, coolest, most insightful bit of research ever.

  BIOTRONIK SELECTRA PDF

If it truly is all of those things, you really don’t have to overtly try to convince me. Jeez, I have to tell a marketer this? Lindstrom fails to point out that even if marketing agencies have access to our innermost motivations, humans are not automatons that have to respond directly to the reptilian portion of our brains.

Granted, it is extremely difficult to be aware of the drive behind our consumeristic urges, but for that I would point readers to Hooked: In fact, if anyone is interested in why people buy crappy products they don’t need with money they don’t have, start with Hooked and leave Lindstrom to his chest thumping.

One redeeming feature of the book: Lindstrom does a nice job of showing how effective various advertising strategies are. Product placement in movies and television? Unless the product is essential to the plot, folks just don’t remember it.

I found his discussion of the ban on tobacco advertising and how tobacco companies have had to get really creative in their marketing to be pretty interesting. It turns out that subliminal advertising works really well for well known, established brands like Camel, Marlboro, etc. But overall, these nuggets weren’t worth the effort of sifting through the rest of the rubbish View all 11 comments. Dec 17, Scribble Orca rated it liked it Recommends it for: What did I think that teasing little prompt to write a review?

Lindstrom’s book reads more like a piece of fiction! If you can wade through the overblown prose read author’s sense of self-importance, borrowed deux ex machina and cliff-hanger endings to various chapters, all of which fizzle out along the wayLindstrom actually has some sound advice for consumers!

If you value your purchasing sovereignty, read this book and borrow it from the library, so as to avoid ‘buying’ into Lindstrom’s h What did I think that teasing little prompt to write a review?

If you value your purchasing sovereignty, read this book and borrow it from the library, so as to avoid ‘buying’ into Lindstrom’s hype. Marketeers matin already implementing some of the ideas in this book, rightly or wrongly and not considering the ethics and the funding of the research Lindstrom undertook.

How does a brand smell? Ultimately, if you can determine what it is that drives you to purchase something, you’re better marin against mindless consumerism.

It might have not been the point Lindstrom wanted to make, but that’s certainly the message I took from the book. Ubyology all 8 comments. Apr 29, notyourmonkey rated it did not like it Shelves: Likely interesting ideas completely subsumed by self-aggrandizement and shitty writing. This book is structured pretty much like an episode of America’s Next Top Model: Tyra wears a jumpsuit, and Andre Leon Talley wears a muumuu w Likely interesting ideas completely subsumed by self-aggrandizement and shitty writing.

Tyra wears a jumpsuit, and Andre Leon Talley wears a muumuu with a face on it!

Everyone’s brains are ugly-pretty! Remember, you’re there to sell clothes, not just look pretty! Feb 21, Dinah rated it did not like it Shelves: Under normal circumstances I wouldn’t even review this book because a it was awful, and b I wanted to throttle the smug little billionaire consultant of an author three times a chapter, and why would I revisit that in a review?

  ANAGYRIS LATIFOLIA PDF

But this is the linddstrom book I’ve legitimately read, start to finish, since starting my crazy new jobs, and I guess that merits some words.

Branding is about emotion. MRIs prove people are deeply ilndstrom of their own preferences and habits, making this guy’s method of brand-testing much more effective than decades-old, pencil-based focus groups and such.

None of those are bad things to know I guess, but this book wasn’t even good enough to get my blood boiling about those effing corporate bastards with all the money to throw around to do huge studies to control our unconscious minds. And that’s one of the easiest buyolofy to get me fired up about!

Buyology: Truth and Lies About Why We Buy and the New Science of Desire by Martin Lindstrom

Mostly there was stating the obvious, then restating it with examples because the assumed reader was too stupid to get it the first time, followed by a cap on each chapter describing what we’d learn in the next. This isn’t Dickens, dude, you’re not serialized. Segue like a grown up. Oh and in case you missed it, Martin Lindstrom is very important!

He makes a lot of money and his opinions are highly regarded in his field! He also finds himself to be rakishly handsome and clever! Dec 08, Matt rated it did not like it. I normally love books about consumer psychology From the first page, the author seems more interested in convincing you how important he is than in conveying any substantive information. By page 16, I didn’t care enough about the subject to keep going.

View all 6 comments. Apr 07, James rated it liked it Shelves: Given my enthusiasm for Oliver Sacks and some of Malcolm Gladwell’s writings, one might presume Buyology would be the perfect blend of the two worlds. One would be mistaken.

Buyology: Truth and Lies About Why We Buy and the New Science of Desire

This book, although a worthwhile read, suffers from an overinflated sense of self-importance. Consider how Gladwell buyklogy say obvious things in such a low-key way that you take time to consider his arguments fully. This careful subtlety is lost on Lindstrom, who continually injects the book with references to his own importance Given my enthusiasm for Oliver Sacks and some of Malcolm Gladwell’s writings, one might presume Buyology would be the perfect blend of the two worlds.

This careful subtlety is lost on Lindstrom, who continually injects the book with references to his own importance as a consultant. He also regularly inflates the actual novelty of the research he is reporting on, referring to it as the largest neuroscientific marketing research effort ever conducted. Such superlatives belie the basic science and make much of this book feel like puffery. Which is a shame because the content, stripped of the puffery and exaggeration, is interesting and scientifically valid.

In the lindstrmo of a less self-promotional author, the same material might have soared beyond the business shelves of the bookstore to attract the general reader.